Trail Project Could Threaten Historic Ballard Avenue

The four proposed Missing Link routes to complete the Burke-Gilman Trail.  Source: Seattle Department of Transportation.

The four proposed Missing Link routes to complete the Burke-Gilman Trail.  Source: Seattle Department of Transportation.

The Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) recently released its plans to complete the Burke-Gilman Trail. The popular and well-traveled bike and walking trail consists of two segments, with a “missing link” in Ballard. To make the trail one continuous route, SDOT proposes four possible routes through Ballard, as illustrated in the map, above.

The four routes up for consideration are:

  • Shilshole Ave (South Side)
  • Shilshole Avenue (North Side)
  • Ballard Avenue
  • Leary Avenue

If Ballard Avenue were to become the “missing link” route, the BG Trail would run through the Ballard Avenue Landmark District. It would directly impact the small businesses along Ballard Avenue and it would threaten the future of the Ballard Farmers Market, now in its 16th year.

But here’s the thing: Time is of the essence. The public comment period ends August 1.

Here's What You Can Do

  • Come to Ballard Farmers Market on Sunday, July 3 (10 a.m. to 3 p.m.) to learn more about the proposed “missing link” routes.  SFMA staff will have an information table set up with pamphlets and postcards addressed to SDOT Director Scott Kubly, so that your voice is heard. (If you’re out of town for the long holiday weekend, stop by next Sunday, July 10, when we’ll continue spreading the word.)
  • Contact SDOT directly: Email: BGT_MissingLink_Info@seattle.gov  Or via USPS:

Scott Kubly, Director 

Seattle Department of Transportation 

c/o Mark Mazzola, Environmental Manager

P.O. Box 34996

Seattle, WA, 98124-4996

  • Contact Seattle City Council

Mike O’Brien: He represents District 6, which includes Ballard.

Lorena Gonzalez and Tim Burgess, the two at-large Councilmembers, representing the entire city